Mexican jumping beans are real seeds that jump in the warmth of your hand… but only because there is a moth larvae inside the seed pod, and the bug is twitching to move the seed to a cooler place, so it doesn’t die.

beesandbombs:

pendulums

more like pendul-YUMS

beesandbombs:

pendulums

more like pendul-YUMS

compoundchem:

Ever wondered how much water/caffeine/alcohol you’d need to drink to reach a lethal dose? This graphic shows the median lethal dose for all three!Read more detail about LD50 tests in the accompanying post: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-ol

118 coffees.

compoundchem:

Ever wondered how much water/caffeine/alcohol you’d need to drink to reach a lethal dose? This graphic shows the median lethal dose for all three!

Read more detail about LD50 tests in the accompanying post: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-ol

118 coffees.

thefluffingtonpost:

Top 4 Animal Inventors of the 21th Century

We all know humans are great and smart, blah blah blah. But what about the technological contributions of animals? Our first original FluffPo Comic highlights the greatest scientific minds of the animal kingdom.

Comic by Max Knoblauch.

Love animals as much as we do? Check out explore.org's network of live cams on bears, baby birds, puppies, kittens and more.

This is the best.

lickystickypickyshe:

In an ongoing series on hybridizing fruit trees, Syracuse University sculptor Sam Van Aken’s Tree of 40 Fruit is true to its name. Most of the year, it looks pretty ordinary, but in the spring, the tree blossoms display various tones of pink, crimson, and white. Then, from July through October, it bears 40 different types of stone fruit, including almonds, apricots, cherries, nectarines, peaches, and plums. 
The feat is accomplished by grafting together several different varieties, including native fruit, heirlooms, and antiques, some of which are centuries-old, Aken tells Epicurious. 
His main source is an orchard at the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station, which he leased when he heard the orchard was to be torn down. After developing a timeline of when each of the 250 varieties blossom in relation to each other, he would graft a few onto the root structure of a single tree. When his “working tree” was about two years old, he would add more varieties onto the tree as separate branches — a technique called “chip grafting,” Science Alert explains. A sliver that includes a bud is inserted into an incision in the working tree and then taped in place. After it heals over the winter, the branch becomes just another normal branch on the tree, to be pruned as usual.
So far, 16 of these Trees of 40 Fruit have been grown, each taking about five years. He picked stone fruits because they’ve got a lot of diversity and they’re inter-compatible. And a bit of garlic and peppermint repellents keep deer away. 
“By grafting these different varieties onto the tree in a certain order I can essentially sculpt how the tree is to blossom,” he says. “I’ve been told by people that have [a tree] at their home that it provides the perfect amount and perfect variety of fruit.”

Grafting.

lickystickypickyshe:

In an ongoing series on hybridizing fruit trees, Syracuse University sculptor Sam Van Aken’s Tree of 40 Fruit is true to its name. Most of the year, it looks pretty ordinary, but in the spring, the tree blossoms display various tones of pink, crimson, and white. Then, from July through October, it bears 40 different types of stone fruit, including almonds, apricots, cherries, nectarines, peaches, and plums. 

The feat is accomplished by grafting together several different varieties, including native fruit, heirlooms, and antiques, some of which are centuries-old, Aken tells Epicurious

His main source is an orchard at the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station, which he leased when he heard the orchard was to be torn down. After developing a timeline of when each of the 250 varieties blossom in relation to each other, he would graft a few onto the root structure of a single tree. When his “working tree” was about two years old, he would add more varieties onto the tree as separate branches — a technique called “chip grafting,” Science Alert explains. A sliver that includes a bud is inserted into an incision in the working tree and then taped in place. After it heals over the winter, the branch becomes just another normal branch on the tree, to be pruned as usual.

So far, 16 of these Trees of 40 Fruit have been grown, each taking about five years. He picked stone fruits because they’ve got a lot of diversity and they’re inter-compatible. And a bit of garlic and peppermint repellents keep deer away. 

“By grafting these different varieties onto the tree in a certain order I can essentially sculpt how the tree is to blossom,” he says. “I’ve been told by people that have [a tree] at their home that it provides the perfect amount and perfect variety of fruit.”

Grafting.

“This time, be kind to one another. Remember: each of you wants to be happy. And I want you to. Each of you wants to live free from fear. And I want you to. Each of you are secretly afraid that you are not good enough. But you are, trust me, you are.”

-

George Saunders, The Brief and Frightening Reign of Phil


Yay! Except those are the result of physical manipulation of the retinal cells, called phosphenes! Yay!

James Turrell, The Space that Sees (1992) at the Israel Museum. 

James Turrell, The Space that Sees (1992) at the Israel Museum

radandhungry:

 A Magical Combination – The Adventures of the Sushi Cat

(via designboom)

archatlas:

Kiddie Arts Telmo Pieper

"Digital painted creatures and stuff based on my own childhood drawings. I designed these creatures at the age of 4 and now reincarnated them with digital painting"